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Too many gardening magazines these days are trying to sanitize themselves and create more Real Simple/ Martha Stewart lookalikes. There's nothing wrong with those two publications, we just don't need a mother/daughter fashion spread in every gardening magazine. I'd like to see more nitty-gritty niche publications, but I guess everyone has to find a way to stay profitable.

Please.
Pretty please.
Pick me. Really.

couldn't even consider subscribing at that price, but would love to see it! this issue teases with "cooperative farms of new orleans", "fermentation feast", "weird & wonderful mushroom future"...

Substance seems to be what they promise. That to me is what is missing in most traditional garden mags. And yes, I am the demographic for the trad magazine. ButI no konger buy them. They are a waste of time, they tell me nothing new or interesting. The internet however, provies eg g'
areden Rant and I am a faithful reader. would love to win a subscription.....

have not subscribed to a magazine in like 10 years. get them and look at pics, but don't read. blogs and quick articles in NYT and articles people send me links to are they only way i go these days. magazine fun to pick up in doctors office every now and then.

Oooh, this looks lovely. I admit that I love my ereader, but am not totally ready for all magazines to be digital. I just love holding them. That said, i'm sure that's the direction we're heading one day soon.

I have had a subscription to most 'gardening' magazines over the years and am heartily bored with the same old same old. I have dropped all because of the fluff. I am looking for something different and this sounds like a great possibility.

Looks like a really classy magazine. No magazines arrive in my mailbox anymore but this one is tempting. I do the marketing for my son's landscaping business....and would probably find inspiration for future newsletters.

Community gardening and public garden movements are areas that are completely ignored in garden magazines. The garden magazines have catered to the notion that garden's exist to embellish property. Wilder sounds much more well rounded, and emphasizes how we green spaces are linked.

I grew up on a farm (all crops, southeastern US) and don't know the slightest thing about planting and growing food. I think the world is moving in a direction where that won't be possible anymore.

Hi I love the idea of a new PRINT magazine. I guess I'm old school, but I love having the magazine in my hand; not looking and reading on my computer screen. Organic things like plants and soil and flowers and colors just don't come across on a computer. Isn't that why we all love gardening?

Now hold on a ladies! In my article at http://bit.ly/pSENJ6 I say, "Most garden magazines stick to the classic gardening demographic, which most popular surveys recognize as older, financially secure females with college degrees and no children at home." I'm drawing from gardening demographic studies of which there are many. Each magazine has one. Here's Better Homes and Gardens' for example: http://www.bhgmarketing.com. Many gardening magazines target this demographic in ways I obviously don't agree with having been a key influence behind Wilder Quarterly.

I say, "My hope is that Wilder Quarterly will help track a new course in the garden writing industry and rekindle enthusiasm in the genre." Keep in mind, I'm a middle-aged woman with a college degree and until fairly recently I had no children. Please don't misquote me.

“Clarification is needed. In my blog at http://bit.ly/pSENJ6 I say, "Most garden magazines stick to the classic gardening demographic, which most popular surveys recognize as older, financially secure females with college degrees and no children at home. This is a good thing (we love our serious, dedicated gardeners), but cultural and economic changes are changing the face of the American gardener."

I am not defining the traditional gardening demographic. I am taking from gardening demographic studies of which there are many. Every magazine has one. Here is Better Homes and Garden' for example: http://www.bhgmarketing.com/research.html.

Other than the fact I have kids, I fall into most gardening demographic windows but haven't been fully satisfied with the goods most mags offer either. That's why I worked hard to help shape Wilder Quarterly and hope Wilder Quarterly will help track a new course in the garden writing industry.”

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